changing strings

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changing strings

Postby atticus » Thu Mar 09, 2017 2:16 pm

You can tell I've not done this before!

I am thinking of changing the strings on my Ozark 2011. If I do this, and numbering strings from 1 to 8, would I change them in a sequence of symmetrical pairs, eg 1 and 8, 4 and 5, 2 and 7, 3 and 6?

I don't think it would be wise for me, as a beginner, to remove all the strings and then have to play at holding down the bridge and getting it in the right place. I also noticed that the bridge does not appear to be symmetrical - it seems higher under the G string than under E.
beginner - with an Ozark 2001 mandolin
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Re: changing strings

Postby Dave Hanson » Thu Mar 09, 2017 3:01 pm

Atticus have a look a FRETS.COM it's run by a man called Frank Ford, he is a well respected expert on such things, he gives a step by step guide to changing strings like an expert and most things related to fretted instruments too.

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Re: changing strings

Postby atticus » Thu Mar 09, 2017 3:13 pm

Thank you.

A couple of links on frets.com:

Mandolin "owners manual": http://frets.com/FretsPages/OwnerManual/manmando.html

Re-stringing: http://frets.com/FretsPages/Musician/Ma ... ring1.html
beginner - with an Ozark 2001 mandolin
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Re: changing strings

Postby Ray(T) » Thu Mar 09, 2017 10:54 pm

Change them a pair at a time, use a capo to hold them in place whilst you attend to the tuner end and expect to draw blood!

Changing strings on a mandolin is a pain but it's something that has to be done and you're never going to find someone else to do it for you. I hate it now just as much as I did forty years ago. Don't change them if you need to be able to play the mandolin for something important in the next day or so - new strings take time to settle in - and, if you're buying a new mandolin, tyr to find one with a James tailpiece, they make the job much easier.

Edit - having now looked at the frets.com link posted above, I notice that you are advised to lock the strings on by winding them in a particular way. In my experience, this is unnecessary. I've never locked a string on in my life (but I have taken strings off an instrument that has been strung that way and its a nuisance) and I've never suffered from slipping strings on any of my instruments.
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